Apple’s UK inflation strikes again

What is it with Apple pricing their products more expensively for the UK market?  I just don’t get it.  Apple products are often already overpriced for the technology they’re using, so surely no need to add some weird UK extra charge.  WTF?

On Apple.com the new 13″ Macbook Air is $1,799, which is £919 when I check on xe.com.

Yet, on the Apple UK site it’s a whopping £1,199 – £280 more expensive, or 30% more expensive?! 

Seriously, Apple can see their UK fanboys and girls coming, a mile off.  I’d like to be surprised that people let them get away with it, but sadly I know all the Applonian Missionaries will be rubbing their knees in anticipation of parting with 30% more cash than their American counterparts for their latest slice of devotion.

Advertisements

About Thayer Prime

Tall. Eats a lot. Talks too much. I tweet over @thayer
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Apple’s UK inflation strikes again

  1. Anonymous says:

    VAT
    The UK price includes sales tax, the US price doesn’t as it varies from state to state.
    17.5% on top of 919 would be £1079, which makes the UK version still £120 more, but less than £280 more, so 17.5% again, I think.
    Still sucky. Everyone does this. Have you looked at how much Adobe charge lately? 🙂
    Dan

  2. Anonymous says:

    It’s bad, but not as bad as you think…
    Apple’s US prices don’t include Sales Tax, as it varies State by State, where as Apple’s UK prices do include VAT. So, you have to take the VAT free price for an accurate comparison.
    Gareth.

  3. blech says:

    The obligatory “sales tax” comment
    Look, there is an Apple markup here, but please at least take sales taxes out of the equation first. UK prices include it; US store prices don’t (but if you buy in SF or NY you’ll have to pay it, about 9% in those cases).
    So, after 17.5% UK VAT the converted price you quote becomes £1080. So the markup isn’t 30%, it’s 11%. Still unpleasant, but not quite so horrific as you make out. (And that price you pay in SF? Remember you’re meant to declare laptops when you bring them into the country. I think that’s the saving just about wiped out.)

  4. Thayer Prime says:

    Thanks for all the comments
    Even with the extra tax I didn’t factor in, that’s still 10-11% more than our US friends, which when you’re talking about £1000 is a lot of cashola – £100! Don’t know about anyone else but I wouldn’t but anything that cost me £100 more in this country, on principle alone.

    • Anonymous says:

      Re: Thanks for all the comments
      Erm, don’t you have an XBOX?
      Amazon.com – XBOX 360 Elite System – $449 (£228 on today’s rates).
      Amazon.co.uk – XBOX 360 Elite System – £299. ($586)
      Not sure how the sales tax works on Amazon.com, it wasn’t mentioned.
      It is the same for all US products in Europe / the UK. Levi jeans, XBOXs, and Macs. Apple are no worse than anything else, and are actually a lot better than some. 7 For All Mankind jeans cost about $198 in America, and about £198 in the UK.

  5. Anonymous says:

    Anti-Apple Bias
    Now Thayer, you’re not getting all anti-Apple again, are you? 😉
    I’m not one for Macsturbation, but there’s lots of annoying price differences between here and the US. Most consumer electronics are marked up for the UK, a bit.
    On my last trip to NYC in Nov, it was v. annoying to find most stuff pretty much on par with the UK including stuff from Sony and Nintendo.
    Still, the US looks like it’s sliding into recession, so maybe some price cutting will help bring in those tourist pounds!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s